Recovering Mexican Wolves: A Quick Health Check

Four biologists and veterinarians work on a sedated wolf on a table, taking samples and measurements.
A Mexican wolf from the 2019 survey is processed on a table inside a work trailer outside Alpine, Arizona. Photo: Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team
Four biologists and veterinarians work on a sedated wolf set on top of a blanket on a table outdoors.
For wolves in remote locations, ground crews of trained biologists work on the back of truck beds. Photo: Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team
Someone measures a wolf paw with a special ruler.
Staff measure a wolf’s length, weight, paw, and teeth size during processing. Credit: Arizona Game and Fish Department
A wolf with a purple radio collar runs out of a dark green crate during a release.
A Mexican wolf is released back into its territory following a capture during the 2019 helicopter count and capture operation with a new radio tracking collar. Photo credit: Arizona Game and Fish Department

What will the 2020 Mexican wolf population count be?

We’ll be reviewing count data over the coming months, and sharing that as soon as it’s finalized. Mexican wolf census data is generally available by spring. This year’s data will help determine the minimum number of living wolves at the end of 2020 and provide a benchmark for recovery moving forward.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

We’re dedicated to the conservation, protection and enhancement of fish, wildlife and plants, and their habitats.